End Childhood Hunger

Nearly 300,000 children in Washington live in families that struggle to put nutritious food on the table every day. The issues these children face can be complex; the solution to their hunger is not: Feed children three nutritious meals each and every day.

This is the simple foundation of our strategic plan to end childhood hunger in Washington

One step in the plan is to feed hungry kids during the summer. Currently in Washington State only 11% of children who receive free and reduced cost meals during the school year are accessing free summer meal programs. A small investment of state resources to increase summer meal sites will bring millions in federal dollars to feed kids in local communities.

Read about our proposal to help feed kids all year round.

No Kidding! Blog

Poverty blocks progress, though Washington’s kids gain overall

 

Household incomes for Washington’s poorest families have yet to recover from the 2008 recession, according to the national 2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book from the Annie. E. Casey Foundation.

 

Washington is ranked 15th among the 50 states (PDF) in the Data Book this year; that’s four places higher than last year, when it was ranked 19th.

 

Since 2008, the number of children growing up without health coverage has improved by 38 percent. That’s good news, as coverage is all but essential for kids to see a health professional or get medicine when they’re sick. Credit is due to the state’s Cover All Kids law, which passed in 2007 and created affordable health coverage called Apple Health for Kids. The Affordable Care Act’s 2014 creation of a flexible market for individual plans has also propelled child coverage in Washington to one of the nation’s highest.

 

Yet the child poverty rate is nearly 30 percent higher than it was in 2008, with an additional 59,000 children growing up below the federal poverty level.

McCleary sanctions should advance, not restrict, educational opportunity

 

The state Supreme Court must not order action that would endanger children’s constitutional rights to educational opportunity.

 

So says an Amici Curiae brief filed by four organizations working together to advocate for kids in the context of the McCleary decision. The organizations are Columbia Legal Services, the Equity in Education Coalition, the Children’s Alliance and the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance.

 

Almost half of all Washington children—4 in 10—live in a family with inadequate income. And a rising share of the state’s student body are children of color, who tend to face implicit, institutional and structural racial bias that forms imposing barriers to their success. These factors—whether they take the form of financial insecurity, homelessness, foster care placement, poorer access to health care or household hunger—make a child’s educational opportunity fragile. 

Latest News

Report: More Washington Kids Have Health Coverage, but Poverty Still a Roadblock

Posted on: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 - 12:00am

SEATTLE – Kids and families in Washington state have made some progress in the face of poverty rates that have yet to improve, according to the new national 2016 KIDS COUNT® Data Book from the Annie. E. Casey Foundation.

ADVISORY: Have a Heart for Kids Day brings kids, parents, advocates to Olympia to protect children and families

Posted on: Friday, February 12, 2016 - 11:43am
MEDIA ADVISORY: Fri., Feb. 12, 2016
WHO: Hundreds of parents, their children, and community leaders from across the state, including Spokane, Wenatchee and Seattle.
WHAT: Rally to protect kids and families and deliver the message: “KIDS CAN’T WAIT!” Speaking will be Seattle mother Sebrena Burr, about the power of advocacy to change the lives of children; and Olympia student Ashley Terry, age 14, to tell about her experience struggling with the unmet need for dental care.

Resources

2016 Legislative Review

Created on: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 9:35am

 

This past session, the Children’s Alliance fought for policy solutions rooted in our commitment to improve the lives of Washington’s children and advance racial equity, so every child has the opportunity they deserve.

 

5 Consejos para abogar – Más que aprobar un proyecto de ley o un presupuesto

Created on: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 9:14am

Cuando se aprueba un proyecto de ley, por lo general se escriben las regulaciones que detallan cómo se pondrán en práctica las diferentes partes de la ley.  Usted no tiene que ser un experto en la materia para dar su opinión en esta parte del proceso.  Usted solamente necesita saber dónde encontrar la información y cómo participar

Leye: 5 Consejos para abogar – Más que aprobar un proyecto de ley o un presupuesto