No Kidding! Blog

A Mother’s Day gift for Washington’s kids

 

This Mother’s Day, let’s give moms and other caregivers an important gift: access to high quality, affordable child care. While high quality child care is a critical component of supporting working parents and giving children a strong start in life, the cost of care is a barrier for many families.

Washington was ranked the sixth least affordable state for center-based infant care and the 10th least affordable state for center-based care for a four-year-old. Put into perspective, a minimum-wage worker in Washington would have to work full time from January to August just to pay for child care for one infant.

Good jobs: A great way to end childhood hunger

 

The Children’s Alliance has endorsed Initiative 1433 for a higher minimum wage and paid sick leave all across the state of Washington.

Why YES on 1433? Here’s why. 

KIDS COUNT Data Center chart: Children in Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

Children’s Alliance staff, volunteers and community partners recently re-imagined the future of our work to end childhood hunger. Among our conclusions were these: One way to fight hunger broadly, as well as improve the health, well-being and learning of Washington’s kids, is by erasing disparities across race and ethnicity. And, good jobs are a great way to end hunger.

Higher wages and access to paid sick leave stabilize families and help kids grow up healthy and strong. Approximately 1 in 5 children in our state live in poverty and face long-term barriers to success in school and in life. As this chart shows, Washington’s children of color are more likely to experience poverty than are White children. That’s because the adults in their households have fewer opportunities to work in the good jobs with benefits that are the cornerstone of American prosperity.

Don’t undermine progress for Washington kids

 

Parents, advocates and community leaders during this 2016 legislative session have advocated for greater investments in access to early learning for kids ages birth to 5 and their families. We’ve done it before: last year, the Early Start Act came with the largest investment in early learning in our state’s history. This historic achievement is improving early childhood education for more than 70,000 Washington children. 

But the legislature is poised to undermine this progress. 

Our Statement in Response to Governor Inslee’s Executive Order


Governor Inslee’s Executive Order re: State Blue Ribbon Commission on the Delivery of Services to Children and Families 

Statement from Children’s Alliance, Feb. 18, 2016

Any structural change in the state of Washington’s service delivery for children should be guided by what’s best for kids. And, when not all kids are faring well, our attention and resources should prioritize the most vulnerable. Data about child outcomes in our state show wide disparities in economic security, educational, and health outcomes by family income and race and ethnicity.

Voices for Access to Dental Care

 

The Dental Access Bill, Senate Bill 5465, had a public hearing in the Senate Health Care Committee on Monday, January 25, with members of the Washington Dental Access Campaign (WDAC)—representing the interests of children, elders, rural constituents, dental professionals and advocates for low-income people and communities of color—signing in PRO. Here are a few highlights from the testimony:

Dr. Kevin Nakagaki, DDS, has worked with dental therapists since they were first licensed to practice in Minnesota in 2011. 

“Patients are very accepting of the Dental Therapist, as they are very familiar with the medical model of physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

Dr. Kevin Nakagaki, DDS“In my clinic, after hiring dental therapists, access for my population has increased, and the wait time to be seen has decreased by half. As I have shifted the straightforward dental restorations to the dental therapist, it has freed up my time to concentrate on more complex procedures.

“The dental therapists are very well trained to manage the pediatric population, and the patients (and parents) have been very satisfied-extremely satisfied with their care.

“As the dentists have had the opportunity to work with the therapists, they have found the concept safe, workable, desirable, and have begun requesting new hires for their offices.”

—Dr. Kevin Nakagaki, DDS, Minneapolis