Have a Heart for Kids Day rally, 2015

No Kidding! The Children's Alliance blog

The most dramatic statement of the day?

With the release of the Senate’s budget-slashing proposal and many outraged responses to it, yesterday was pretty dramatic.  But, according to Publicola, our very own Paola Maranan’s call for a tax on high incomes was “the most dramatic statement of the day.”

 --by Carolyn McConnell

New report details drop in private health coverage for kids

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released a report today that looks at trends in health coverage over the past decade. The report, called “At the Brink: Trends in America’s Uninsured,” compiles state-by-state data for a number of groups and issues. Among the trends for Washington state:

Nearly 40,000 new kids will drop into poverty

A new report on child poverty in Washington projects that nearly 40,000 additional kids will drop into poverty by early next year.

The report, The State of Washington’s Children, was prepared by Washington Kids Count, housed at the Human Services Policy Center at the University of Washington.

Tony's pediatrician is no longer the ER

This week, for the first time in his life, five-year-old Tony Johnson got health insurance.  So did his three older siblings. Now their parents, Paula and Ron, can take them to the well-child and dental visits they’ve been missing, and the Johnsons can begin getting out of the medical debt they’ve fallen into.

Home visiting offers help when parents need it most

At age 19, Laura Montejano had cut off ties to her family in a fit of teenage anger and rebellion. Partly to spite her family, she got married—and didn’t tell them. Her new husband, Francisco, was young too, and new to Washington state, with no community ties. Neither had a college diploma; Laura worked as a nursing assistant and Francisco bused tables in a restaurant.

What does Apple Health mean for Zoe?

Last Tuesday, six-year-old Zoe Osborne and her parents got a very special present in the mail: an Apple Health for Kids coupon.  For Zoe and her parents, the legislature’s directive to finally start enrolling families whose coverage was suspended earlier this year isn’t abstract.

CHIP means a whole lot more than $14 million a year

We and others have already reported that Washington state’s Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) allotment from the federal government is getting bumped up by about $14 million a year, giving the state access to an estimated $94 million each year.

While great news for kids, CHIP isn’t just about the allotment.