Have a Heart for Kids Day rally, 2015

Early Learning

Federal money for child care helps, but much more is needed

For healthy development, it’s imperative that babies and toddlers have the strongest learning experiences possible through high-quality early opportunities. Washington state policymakers, child care providers, and advocates have worked diligently on improving child care quality in Washington to give kids a strong start.

http://www.childrensalliance.org/sites/default/files/styles/max_650x650/public/2019-01/think_babies_smiles.jpg?itok=l04HcWix

Support Washington’s babies and young parents

A new KIDS COUNT® policy report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation details hurdles that young parents face to support their children. These barriers threaten both the still-developing young adult parents and their young children, setting off a chain of diminished opportunities for two generations.

What babies, toddlers and new parents need to thrive

As we advocate for the developmental needs of young children, Children’s Alliance has long understood that learning begins at birth. Every interaction, whether it’s with a parent, grandparent, auntie, babysitter or licensed child care professional, is an occasion to build young minds and foster healthy connections.

Don’t undermine progress for Washington kids

 

Parents, advocates and community leaders during this 2016 legislative session have advocated for greater investments in access to early learning for kids ages birth to 5 and their families. We’ve done it before: last year, the Early Start Act came with the largest investment in early learning in our state’s history. This historic achievement is improving early childhood education for more than 70,000 Washington children. 

But the legislature is poised to undermine this progress.